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slamming new york city. >> few more days and no power new york might get weird. >> on cbs "this morning." >> speaking foreign language >> when your city is flooding that's as bad as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. >>> welcome to cbs "this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york, norah o'donnell is in washington. the extent of superstorm sandy's damage has become clearer and more alarming, five a day. this morning sandy is blamed for 75 deaths in ten states. and about 5 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city many subway and commuter trains are now running and the city has put restrictions on drivers trying to get into manhattan. drivers also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. this morning hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore are facing months even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in things where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself on wednesday. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: norah, good morning to you. 14 are dead in new jersey but there is increasing concern that as more homes are searched
mister. >> and all that matters. >> amazing time-lapsed video of sandy slamming new york city, the water rushing in, power going out. >> new york might get weird with a few more days without power. [ speaking spanish ] >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. as you wake up in the west, the extent of superstorm sandy's damage is becoming cloe ining c more alarming. blamed for 75 deaths in 10 states and 4.6 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city, many subway and xhouter trains are now running. drivers are seeing huge traffic jams going into manhattan. they also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore this morning are facing months, even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in atlantic city, where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself. jeff, good
controversy. >>> gas rationing in new york city and long island nearly two weeks after superstorm sandy. after this week's nor'easter frustrations growing for thousands of sandy's victims. mark strassmann is in oceanport, new jersey. mark, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. behind me you see one of fema's two tent cities in new jersey. this one is the new home for 750 emergency workers and 60 storm victims. there are also hundreds of thousands of people waking up in their own cold homes this morning, 11 days after sandy hit this shore line. in wintry somerset county northern new jersey, utility crews are still days away from restoring everyone's power. wednesday's nor'easter with his a setback across the disaster zone. adela bolet just had gotten her electricity back on monday. >> such a relief like returning to civilization. >> reporter: that relief didn't last long. >> and then all of a sudden poof. and there we are, back in the middle ages. >> reporter: governor andrew cuoma blasted lipa utility company that services long island. >> part of it is just the
it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed like toys. that continues throughout the neighborho neighborhood. many residents say they feel ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten burrough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we're going to die! we're going to freeze! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours in to other parts of new york and new jersey. >> they don't talk about them that much. a lot of people here are hurting much it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds
to at least 60,000 homes and businesses in the new york city area. many of them had just got entheir power restored. >> the winter storm brought rain, strong winds and several inches of snow region. airlines cancelled nearly 1600 flights and highways and train routes were also disrupted and families shivered in homes. ben, how is everybody doing? >> reporter: well, norah you can see this is the last thing that people needed. the streets in tuckerton flood again, front yards flood. as nor'easters go this wouldn't be a big deal. but for a couple of days people were able to come back to this neighborhood to save what they could, tearing out carpets, ripping down walls. that has now been put on hold. one woman said this second storm feels like a second punch to the gut. when the nor'easter slammed into the jersey shore wind and rain quickly turned into a whiteout as temperatures plummeted into the low 30s. volunteers handed out blankets for those with no heat. >> just won't end now. unfortunate want it to be over. >> reporter: in snow covered belmar a generate oris running nick's one light and
and businesses in the new york city region many of them had just gotten their power restored. >> the winter storm brought rain, strong winds and several inches of snow to the region. airlines canceled nearly 1,600 flights. highways and train routes were also disrupted and families shivered in homes across the northeast as temperatures fell below freezing. ben tracy is in hard-hit tuckerton, new jersey, along the jersey shore. how are they doing there? >> reporter: charlie and norah, good morning. good morning to our viewers in the west. folks here not doing so well this morning. streets are flood eded here in tuckerton. front yards are flooded. while this nor'easter on its own may not have been that big of a deal, here is the problem. for a couple of days people have been able to come back to neighborhoods like this, to begin the recovery rip out carpets and walls and stay ahead of the mold that is growing in some of these areas. that's all been put on hold. that one woman who told us that the second storm feels like a second punch to the gut. when the nor'easter slammed
are still without electricity and the death toll is 106. schools will reopen this morning in new york city and many other communities however drivers are still waiting in those long lines for gasoline and officials predict another difficult commute because not all subways and trains are running yet. >> there's new urgency in the recovery effort because the weather is not helping. millions of storm victims, jim axelrod is in the hard hit secretary of rockaway, queens. >> reporter: this week the weather forecast is throwing one more challenge at those devastated parts of new york and new jersey. freezing temperatures for 1.5 million customers in two states who are still without power. >> onions, garlic. >> reporter: in the far rockaway section of queens, volunteers aren't waiting for the government to help those who need it, they are doing it themselves. >> people need help. we just thought we would come out and give them some hot food. >> reporter: at this intersection a makeshift supermarket sprang up in a marking lot. donations from churches and synagogues provided the inventory. food, cl
this morning in new york city and many other communities. however, drivers are still waiting in those long lines for gasoline. and officials predict another difficult commute this morning because not all subways and trains are running yet. >> there is new you are jens in the recovery effort this morning because the weather is not helping millions of storm victims. jim axelrod is in the hard hit rockaways section of queens. >> reporter: good morning. this week, the weather forecasts are providing one more challenge for those parts of new york and new jersey that have been devastated by sandy. freezing temperatures that will affect the nearly 1.5 million customers still without power. >> onions. >> reporter: in the far rockaways section of queens, volunteers like diane chang aren't waiting for the government to help those who need it. they're doing it themselves. >> we're told they needed hot food out here. we thought we'd cook some hot food. >> reporter: at this intersection a makeshift supermarket sprang up in a parking lot. donations from churches and synagogues provided the inventory. fo
rationing started this morning in new york city and on long island nearly two weeks after superstorm sandy after this week's nor'easter frustrations growing for thousands of sandy's victims. mark strassman is in oceanport, new jersey. mark, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. behind me is one of fema's two tent cities in new jersey, 750 emergency workers and about 60 storm victims. but there are hundreds of thousands of people waking up in their own cold homes this morning 11 days after sandy hit this coastline. in wintry somerset county, northern new jersey, utility crews are days away from restoring everyone's power. wednesday's nor'easter was a setback across the disaster zone. adela bolet just got her electricity back on monday. >> it was a relief. >> reporter: but that relief didn't last long. >> all of a sudden poof. and there we are back in the middle ages. >> reporter: in new york andrew cuomo blasted the power company that serves long island complaining it mismanaged the crisis. >> part of it is just the management and the performance, which has been unacceptable and they fai
of new york city's deaths happened on staten island. secretary of state janet napolitano will be there today. anna werner is there. >> reporter: good morning. homes are destroyed. the storm threw cars like toys. that's what it looks like all down this street yet many residents say they believe they've been ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten borough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours into other parts of new york and new jersey. >> a lot of people are here. a lot of people are hurting. so, it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds of homes have been destroyed and dozens of streets are impassable. still, the city is planning to go ahead with its annual marathon, which kicks off on staten island's verrazano bridge sunday. >> we're far from fine. the fact the mayor wants to have a marathon this weekend
with the city of new york. this morning we'll ask him why he won't give up outtakes and other material. now it's time for health watch. holly philips has the ricks on a high sodium diet. >> good morning in today's health watch pass on the salt. recent reports may have toledo confusion about the amount of salt you should have in your diet. a new study reveals limiting your salt intake. factors would benefit from lowering salt consumption to 1500 milligrams per day. that's the equivalent of less than a teaspoon. for some people salt increases blood pressure because it holds excess fluid in the body. it forces the heart to work harder to pump blood throughout the body. one in three americans have high blood pressure a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. if your blood pressure is 120 over 80 or above your doctor will advice a lower salt diet. skip the table salt but most come from packaged processed food so read be labels carefully. most americans eat more than double the amount of recommended salt daily but a little planning and will power we can shake the salt habit. i'm dr. holly ph
rationing ended in new jersey this morning, but continues in new york city and long island. new york governor andrew cuomo is asking the federal government for $30 billion more in disaster aid. cuomo also says long island's main power company was not prepared and he is planning an investigation. >>> it is time now to show you some of this morning's headlines from around the globe. "the wall street journal" reports on a prediction on the united states will become the world's largest oil producer eight years from now. according to an independent consulting firm, a boom in shale oil will left the united states above saudi arabia. >>> the "seattle post-intelligencer" says cray has built the world's fastest computer. it began operating last month. the titan xk-7 uses enough electricity to power 9,000 homes. >>> british lawmakers say starbucks use their profiting tricks to move profits out of the country. >>> "usa today" says america's premature birthrate has hit its lowest death rate in a decade. it has been falling the past five years. >>> the austin american statesman reports lance arms
in new york city in about an hour and a half to tour the devastation left by hurricane sandy. then tomorrow he sits down with congressional leaders from both sides to discuss ways to avoid going over the fiscal cliff. charlie and norah? >> nancy cordes, thank you. cbs political director john dick erson is here with me. >> it's good to be in washington. >> you've reversed roles here. you're here and norah is in new york. mindful of second-term presidents who overreach. there was a part of it that was restrained yesterday. the part that wasn't was when he took a whack at senators mccain and graham. that stood out in part in contrast to the other reserved approach he took to taxes, even saying he was being self reflective about dealing with congress, on the one hand, being self reflective about dealing with congress on the other hand he was so strong with mccain and graham. mccain and graham are taking a political shot at the president by picking on susan rice. if they want to pick on anyone, they should pick on him or the intelligence chiefs who gave her the intelligence that s
will be worse at the petraeus house. >> every thanksgiving new york city has a parade. did you know that? we'll have a preview when cbs "this morning" continues. they got floats balloons and everything. your local news is coming up next. we're talking to brook a how do you always have my favorite coffee? well, inside the brewer, there's a giant staircase. and the room is filled with all these different kinds of coffee. actually, i just press this button. brew what you love, simply. keurig. >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald >>> good morning, everybody. 8:25 your time. i'm frank mallicoat with your cbs 5 headlines on this thanksgiving morning. >>> it was the investigation of a shootout between two cars that shut down an oakland freeway last night. the bullet-riddled cars were found abandoned along westbound 580. no word on what happened to the occupants. they both got away. >> some kmart shoppers in san mateo upset. they waited in line all night long to buy low-priced big screen tvs but only 10 were available when the doors opened at kmart at 6:00 thi
sandy will continue in new york city the rest of the week despite the holiday. and drivers nationwide will have to dig a bit deeper to fill up. the national average price of gas is just about $3.40 a gallon, a drienecline of 40 cents a gallon since october but still on track to set an all-time thanksgiving high. more than 20,000 flights were canceled and airports were closed for days. that industry was quick to bounce back as 3 million travelers are expected to fly this week. >> lingering side effects or after effects of airlines either operationally or financially, everything should be all systems go for this weekend. >> back on the new jersey turnpike, imagine these roads in a couple of hours. more than a million new jersey residents expected to be on the move today. although from my experience on the new jersey turnpike probably not moving as quickly as they would like. charlie? >> jim, remember what my mother used to say to me. just because you love cars you don't have to be the fastest and best driver on the road. >> your mother was a smart woman. i'll kee
that is the case here. >> we first showed this to you yesterday at the new york city police officer who never stood taller than when he stood down to help a homeless man. john miller, former nypd deputy commissioner has this story. good morning. >> good morning charlie and norah. this will probably be the first and last ever nice story i tell on this show. norman rockwell, story reminder of dickens and the best part about the story was it was never intended to be told. officer larry deprimo was walking a beat in times square. it was a frigid mid november night. >> i had two pairs of winter socks on and my combat boots and my feet were still cold. i was standing on west 44th and broadway and i heard somebody laughing. >> they were laughing at a homeless man, barefoot on the freezing pavement. >> you could just see the blisters, you know. he was just walking on the bottoms of his feet there. it upset me. i went up to him and said, where are your socks? where are your shoes? he's like, it's okay, officer. i never had a pair of shoes. >> so he ran two blocks to this shoe store. the store's surveillance
tland pony ran wild through the streets of new york city. they apparently escaped from a petting zoo. >>> nypd says actress lindsay lohan has been raefed and charged with assault. >> three, two, one. >> only nbc would make a television event out of plugging something in. >> all that -- >> oh, humphries and rondo get into it. officials trying to get control here. >> don't tell me what i think. when i said i didn't have a problem, i don't have a problem. got it? >> and all that matters. >> president obama plans to play host to his old political rival, mitt romney. >> on "cbs this morning." for lesss part of president afford to picko cut spending, invite someone to lunch who can actually afford to pick up the tab. you are probably waking up, wondering if you are a power ball multimillionaire. there's good news and then there's bad news. >> that's right. good news, there were two winning tickets for that record $587 million jackpot. re those ticketse dream lives on only if you live in missouri or anotherwhere those tickets were sold. havet there's another drawing this saturday and we'll
company toppled over in new york city during superstorm sandy. welcome back to "cbs this morning," everyone. >>> baby boomers who don't want to put their parents in a nursing home have a new alternative alternative. they're nicknamed granny pods. they a in milpitas, police are trying to find a man who shot at an ng an overnight sa. >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald. >>> good morning. 7:26 on a tuesday. i'm frank mallicoat. get you caught up with some bay area headlines of a busy morning. in milpitas police trying to find a man who shot an officer during an overnight traffic stop. the officer was not hit by gunfire but suffered minor injures. >> a man killed himself after a standoff overnight on treasure island. he was chased by police. >>> a woman as tied up and called 911 when her boyfriend threatened to hang her. he was arrested. she was uninjured. traffic and weather coming right up. >>> good morning. the bay bridge is backed up. we had an earlier police standoff at treasure island. all the off-ramps are reopened. we are deali
has proposed cutting $8 million from new york city's libraries in order to balance the budget. librarians are furious. they were like are you kidding me? [ laughter ] this is bull crap. >>> now to a serious story. the man who makes elmo move and talk is in the middle of a grown-up controversy. a former boyfriend accuses the "sesame street" puppeteer getting involved with him when he was just 16. we'll hear from both sides. that's ahead on "cbs this morning." neighborhood is overwhelmed with >>> this is a cbs 5 eyewitness news morning update. >>> good morning everyone. it's 7:56. i'm frank mallicoat. a daly city neighborhood is overwhelmed with mud and 45,000- gallons o of water it happened earlier this morning and elissa harrington joins us live to explain exactly what happened. >> reporter: daly city cleaning crews are hosing mud off the streets trying to get debris out of the drain after an underground pipe broke early this morning. now, that pipe was up the hill at hillside park and was connected to a water storage tank. an estimated 45,000-gallon
kitchen and bar in new york city, his newest restaurant the food is leaving critics with a bad taste in their mouths. a really bad taste. the "new york times" gave the restaurant no stars, not one. instead food critic pete wells calls it poor and serves up insults. were you struck by how very far from awesome the awesome pretzel chicken tenders are. did you try that blue drink, the one that gloss like nuclear waste. any idea why it tastes like some combination of radiator flew ud and formaldehyde. russ parsons is food editor of the "new york times." ep said the problem is guy's american kitchen isn't selling all american food. in place of a cheeseburger guy offers a black angus patty with donkey sauce. >> something he invented like donkey sauce. that cracked me up. would you eat something with donkey sauce? >> reporter: in this case bad food could cook up good publicity. >> how bad can a negative review be for business. >> in this case it could help. i'll probably pass by and see what it's all about. >> you want to see if that margarita tastes like radiator fluid. >> reporter: one ba
that damaged train tums between new jersey and new york city. many residents remain without power and heat and struggling to survive. elaine quijano is on staten island. president obama was there to see the damage yesterday. elaine, good morning. >> good morning, elaine and charlie. the job of rebuilding here is so big that president obama has assi assigned a federal point person, asking housing and urban development secretary sean donovan to work with local officials as they begin the long process of recovering. in hard-hit staten island where residents are just beginning to rebuild their lives, president obama pledged the government's support and urged insurance companies to pledge theirs. >> the insurance companies and some of the other private sector folks who are involved in this, we need you to show some heart and some spirit in helping people rebuild as well. >> reporter: the president met with families who lost everything, like sheila and dominic traina, superstorm sandy destroyed the home they lived in for 32 years. dominic says he's still waiting to hear back from his insurance c
light running incidents have dropped near or around 80%. >> reporter: new york city firefighter tom buttaro knows all about it. he received a ticket after a camera caught his wife going through a red light. >> the light was 3.9 seconds when my wife went through the intersection. i did research and the proper time is 5.4 seconds. a second and a half shorter than it's supposed to be. >> reporter: on a road with a 55 miles per hour speed limit, that didn't give her enough time to stop. buttaro said he's begun to wonder what the motive behind the red light cameras is. >> unfortunately the farther i look into it, the less >>> it's believed more than half of people who see somebody else yawn will start yawning themselves within the next few minutes. charlie's yawning now. scientists are going to the dogs. that's right. to explain what happens and why it happens. that's next on "cbs this morning." tell me that i did a good job. tell me we'll always be together. ♪ tell me i've still got it. that our traditions matter. tell me you love me for who i am. that you can't wait to be home. tell
it in a logical fashion. i took the last two years and looked at people like josh here in new york city who was the basis for searching for bobby fisher and actually learned chess in reverse. start with the end game. or people like daniel in uk who sailed the icelandic. trying to pick out the commonalities. what do they use. how do they look at things. then putting that into a blueprint that anybody can apply in something they want to learn. >> so in consideration of all that, how difficult was it to attack cooking? >> really difficult for me because i had no basis for let's say memorizing flavors. remembering taste was difficult. working with my girlfriend in the kitchen, she was very patient. i would ask her maybe 20 times a week is this basil? what is this? basil. just trying to figure out how to facility that process. researchers say there's something called the manil sensory institute. they taught me their taste receptors in the mouth and throat and stomach so i was able to hack it. >> you also use a term chef, though, tim as being the boss of your own life. >> right. >> what should we
of like new york's statue of liberty. >> yes. a re-do. >>> up next you can't always avoid flight delays but can reduce chances of being on a late night. travel eder peter greenberg is here to show you how to better your odds. that's ahead on cbs "this morning." >>> this portion of cbs "this morning" sponsored eded by citi price rewind. buy now, save later. 't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. >>> the coast guard pulled three people from a burning yacht off the coast of miami beach saturday. no one was injured. the cause of this fire is still under investigation. incredible pictures there. >>> where can you find the best coffee in the world? todd carmichael has the answers traveling the world looking for the best coffee bean. >> sounds fun. that searc
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)